Podkarpackie

Regional capital: Rzeszów

The Region

Iwonicz Zdrój, photo: K. Zajączkowski, UMWP
Iwonicz Zdrój, photo: K. Zajączkowski, UMWP

The Podkarpackie region has always been a borderland. Its rich history and the centuries-old coexistence of different ethnic groups within its ambits gave rise to cultural qualities without compare in the other regions of Poland, enhanced by the wealth of the natural environment. Which is, perhaps, why it is such a favourite with people from Poland and Europe alike.

Landscape

Bieszczady Mountains, photo: K. Zajączkowski, UMWP
Bieszczady Mountains, photo: K. Zajączkowski, UMWP

The jewels of the Podkarpackie region are certainly the Bieszczady Mountains, a European oasis of nature more recently running wild and concealing almost five hundred years of material cultural remains associated with the Boykos, the Poles and the Jews who lived there. The Beskid Niski (Low Beskids) also have much to offer, especially the Higher Wisłok Valley, where the dominant ethnic group was once the Łemkowie (the Lemkos). The Pogórze Strzyżowsko-Dynowskie (Strzyżów-Dynów Foothills) and the Pogórze Przemyskie (Przemyśl Foothills) are famous for the qualities of their superb landscapes. In the northern area of the region, the Kotlina Sandomierska (Sandomierz Basin) and the neighbouring Roztocze Upland, with its rolling hills and tree-covered slopes, are surprisingly rich in cultural relics.


Cities and Sites

Krasiczyn Castle, photo: K. Zajączkowski, UMWP
Krasiczyn Castle, photo: K. Zajączkowski, UMWP

Rzeszów is an attractive, dynamic city of young, enterprising people. It is also the region’s administrative centre. A strong democratic tradition which stretches back to the mid-nineteenth century has had a significant influence on the nature of the city’s modern community. Combined with their hospitality, the openness of the people of Rzeszów to new ideas and ventures creates a friendly and fruitful atmosphere for investors and visitors coming to their home town.

Another of the Podkarpackie region’s important cities is Przemyśl. Situated at the foot of the Carpathians and vaunting a wealth of more than a thousand historical sites, it enchants us with an unforgettable landscape of steep, narrow streets, clustering historical buildings and old churches with towers that ascend ever higher.

On the central section of the river Vistula there lies a shining pearl of sixteenth-century Poland; the castle in Baranów Sandomierski. The castle and the adjacent Castle Hotel are surrounded by fourteen hectares of parkland charmingly set in the landscape of the Vistula plains. As a former seat of the Leszczyński dynasty, the castle is also known as ‘Little Wawel’.